The Poorly-Dressed Tourist Visits England

I went to London last week. London, in my opinion, is a lot like New York except with more fantastic accents and lots of old, old buildings. Feel free to disagree with me.

We spent most of our time wandering in and out of museums and historical monuments, and the rest of our time playing the Circle Game. Really, one day I’ll need to grow up or something.

Here are some important things I learned while in London:
1. No matter how badly I want Thames to be pronounced how it’s spelled, it will probably always be pronounced “Temz.”
2. Pudding, as it turns out, is just another word dessert. This article makes brief mention of it. Proof.
3. You know how you’re supposed to try and blend in and whatever when visiting a place? I can safely assure you this never works for me, no matter how hard I try. Not only am I regularly the most underdressed individual in Wichita, I was the most underdressed person in London too. In fact, I am probably the most underdressed person in the Western world.

I planned some sort of really clever blog post for these images, but the words are just not coming to me.

Anyway, here’s a semi-chronological photo journey of my trip:

London’s city hall. What an incredible win of a building. I have about 5 million photographs of this building, just because it was so fantastic.


Tower Bridge.

A very enthusiastic beefeater describing Tower of London’s gory history. Wonderful, just wonderful.


A metal glove thing in the White Tower.

Banana milk is not nearly as fun as its title suggests.

Tower of London from the Tower Bridge. Look at all that old-new architectural juxtaposition!


Free stickers are really the best. Interactive exhibit at the Tate Modern.

La de dum de da. Still at the Tate Modern.

The entrance way of the British Library.

Street musician.

A man in a hat at Trinity College in Cambridge.

Another Cambridge college.

Oh, sakes alive! Mind the gap. MIND THE GAP! A very nice British voice constantly reminded us of this at every stop so we wouldn’t become whatever the poor gentleman in the image above is likely destined to be.

Just for you, El. I’ll have you know I was scolded by a very nice British lady for photographing this Darwin bust. Photography, as it turns out, is not allowed in the National Portrait Gallery. That’s OK though, because, like nearly every other museum we visited, the National Portrait Gallery is free of charge. Very free of charge.

There were some museums more lenient on photography, though, such as the Science Museum:

Here’s a great, big, random sculpture of sorts. It’s made up of layer upon layer of various materials. See the images below:

Close-up of the sculpture.

The wall of materials!

Also, the Victoria and Albert Museum is pretty rad too.

You know who’s kind of a character? Winston Churchill. On my grandparents’ suggestion, we visited the Churchill War Room -a wonderfully informative and interactive museum in the original WWII Cabinet War Rooms. I highly recommend it to anyone. Based on the quotes below, I can only image Churchill was a bit of an insufferable individual to be around. A very hilarious insufferable individual, though.

And, my personal favorite:

I planned to shout this at the poor waitstaff at the next restaurant I receive an unsatisfactory dessert from. Which will probably be never, as I’m a bit stingy and never order dessert.

Anyway, that’s about it. Life is now back to awkward Zumba, cheesy crackers, and mad attempts to complete this week’s Quarter Life Crises challenge. Cheerio!

Through My Headphones
*The Delicate Place -Spoon

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